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Nurturing Time

A Father's Presence with JerSean Golatt

Posted on 06/15/22

Father’s Day is a time to reflect on the figures who have nurtured and shaped our paths, guiding us to become the best versions of ourselves. Join us for our first 'Nurturing Time: A Father's Presence' interview, featuring Dallas-based Photographer and Director JerSean Golatt, where he shares the processes of fatherhood, cultivating a safe environment for exploration and, creating a healthy relationship with his children.

Describe fatherhood in your own words.

 

Fatherhood has universal truths like protection, provision, patience, etc. Beyond that, to me, fatherhood can be summed up as simply being present when your child needs you. Our responsibility to our children is to help them navigate life with the space to make mistakes and help them learn how to handle them - to notice the gaps that arise in their lives and help them find solutions to bridge those gaps. We are raising future adults, and it’s our job to help them fill their toolkits as best we can so hopefully they can handle what life throws at them once they’ve left the nest.

 

What did you envision fatherhood would be like before becoming a Father?

 

Honestly, I didn’t think about fatherhood until I became a father. I just knew it was something that would come later in life and that it wouldn’t be easy, but knew deep down that I would be up for the challenge and would do my best to be a “good dad.”

 

What’s the most rewarding part of being a father?

 

Seeing your child learn something new is such a fulfilling experience. Sometimes you can spend days on end with them working on something like riding a bike and then one day they finally get it! It’s the proudest feeling!

"Our responsibility to our children is to help them navigate life with the space to make mistakes and help them learn how to handle them..."

What’s the most challenging part of being a father?

 

One of the most challenging parts of being a father is remembering that children are children. I know that sounds crazy, but there are times when you’re just shook at something they do. Having the ability to level-set expectations and meet them where they are is something I have to remind myself to do often.

 

Time is evolving, but is there one truth that your parents instilled upon raising you, and do you find that it’s still something that works in raising your children?

 

My parents are very passionate about entrepreneurship and they helped me see what’s possible if I built a career centered around my talents. Cultivating an environment for my children to explore their talents and helping them take advantage of the opportunities that become available to them when they value their talents is something I hope works in raising my children as well.

"Cultivating an environment for my children to explore their talents and helping them take advantage of the opportunities that become available..."

Are there any sentimental experiences you hope to share from your childhood with your children?

 

When I was little, my dad would take us to the Martin Luther King Day parade every year. Creating traditions with my kids at similar events is something I’m looking forward to. I want them to feel a sense of pride and connection to their black history just like I did. This year we will be attending a block party my sister Nikayla is organizing to celebrate Juneteenth, which also happens to be on Father’s Day.

 

Do you have any advice about fatherhood?

 

Try your hardest to not yell at your children. This can be difficult sometimes, but it’s something that I think creates a healthy relationship between you and your children by showing them that frustration and conflict can be handled in a positive way instead of using force or yelling. Furthermore, you benefit by growing your ability to be patient and kind with your children, who need that most during these tough times. Give them a safe place to go to when they need you.